From the blog.

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slack-cmyk

Slack. Less Bad Than The Rest.

447 Words. Plan about 3 minute(s) to read this.

A topic I complain about with some regularity is my inability to keep up with incoming messages. I’m too busy creating something for someone else to consume to bother trying to keep up. That’s the way of things. If I successfully keep up with all the input, I never achieve useful output.

In this world of message misery, Slack is my friend. I find that Slack is better at managing input than most other forms of communication.

As Slack groups form (I’m in 8 now), it allows me to interact with people in a private or semi-private manner in a way that’s less intrusive than Google Hangouts or an iMessages chat room.

Slack groups are far better for me than e-mail. I have a passionate dislike for e-mail, although I’ve gotten better at managing it with process and tools. E-mail remains useful to me because it’s the lowest common denominator of communications. If nothing else works, then I can probably send the person an e-mail.

At the moment, Slack is the “least worst” way to manage communication for me.

  • I can mute as well as tune notifications. I often mute entire channels that do not require real-time interaction. I can also set do not disturb times. I can also tailor notifications on mobile differently from notifications on my desktop. I find real-time notification disruptive, so I tend to shut them all off with a few exceptions for co-workers who likely need my attention immediately.
  • I can organize the messages. This is a function of how Slack works. There is a natural hierarchy of groups, public and private channels, private group chats, and one-to-one chats.
  • I can search the messages. Message search is absolutely critical for any message database where the data contains action items. Slack has never failed me. My inbox search has been great with web-native Gmail, which I never use. Airmail, my current favorite IMAP client, does search reasonably well, but I’ve found message search to fall short on all other IMAP clients I’ve tried.
  • I can set reminders. This simple feature is a valuable aid to not forget an action item.
  • I can integrate with other apps. Slack has an API, and there is a good bit of integration with other tools that makes Slack my one-stop shop for keeping up with what’s going on in my company. For instance, Trello activity can be reflected in a Slack channel.

Therefore, Slack becomes chat with the benefit of e-mail search, and without the cryptic clumsiness of IRC. Since I deal with a company team as well as peers spread all over the world, Slack fits. IMO, it’s the best way to deal with a bad problem.

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