From the blog.

Managing Digital Racket
The more I tune out, the less I miss it. But that has presented me with some complex choices for a nuanced approach to curb
Complexity – My Friend, My Enemy
Over my years of network engineering, I've learned that the fewer features you can implement while still achieving a business goal, the better. Why? Fewer

CCDE Bootcamp with Jeremy Filliben, Day Three

261 Words. Plan about 1 minute(s) to read this.

The key takeaway for me today was one repeated point. It’s not enough to know why the right answer is right. You’ve also got to know why the wrong answer is wrong. Today, I screwed up on both accounts while going through practice scenarios. In one case, I had the right answer, but for the wrong reason. In another, I assumed a particular answer was wrong, but I didn’t really know why it was wrong. It just didn’t seem right. In other situations, I couldn’t really decide between a couple of answers, because they seemed like shades of gray to me. In the context of CCDE, that’s not good enough.

Here’s what I mean. If I don’t know why a particular technology is an inappropriate fit for a given problem, what that really means is that I don’t understand that technology. If I don’t understand it that well, then I’m ill-equipped to go to the exam and expect to be able to thoroughly grok every situation and apply the right tools to it. Jeremy made the point this morning that one of his goals with his CCDE bootcamp is to put tools in our toolbox. If we have all the tools and understand how to use them, then we’ll know when they fit a given situation, and when they don’t. And therefore, we’ll come up with the correct design to resolve a given problem within the confines of the supplied constraints.

Exactly. I have more reading to do. Evernote is my co-pilot. You should see my article list. It’s gotten absurd.