From the blog.

Managing Digital Racket
The more I tune out, the less I miss it. But that has presented me with some complex choices for a nuanced approach to curb
Complexity – My Friend, My Enemy
Over my years of network engineering, I've learned that the fewer features you can implement while still achieving a business goal, the better. Why? Fewer

Cisco’s Renewed Customer Focus & Alienating Your Coworkers

303 Words. Plan about 2 minute(s) to read this.

I’ve written a couple of posts this week so far, both of which hit today, 16-July-2013. One is up at Network Computing, and the other is at The Tech Interview, a new career focused site well worth visiting.

Cisco Renews Focus on Network Engineers

I believe Cisco’s focus is shifting back to the customer. And not just any customer, but the ones that makes up its core business: those who run value-added networks. This change has been building for a while; for instance, Flip is dead and Linksys has gone to Belkin. While Scientific-Atlanta is still on the books due to Cisco’s interest in the global video market, rumors that Cisco considered selling it are a Google search away. More substantial changes appeared during Cisco Live in Orlando, where I felt like my old Cisco was back.

Read more on my blog at Network Computing.

Don’t Alienate Your Co-Workers With Your Passion

We geeks love our tech. Really love it. I mean…really, really get down deep into a technology, decide it’s the best thing ever, and then wave the flag around high. Make the wallpaper. Wear the t-shirt. Evangelize the ignorant. Shout down the naysayers. Mock the competitors. Fan the flames of rivalry. Linux vs. Microsoft. Mac vs. PC. PS3 vs. XBox. EIGRP vs. OSPF. IOS vs. Junos. Geeks *care* about this stuff. If you identify with this paragraph, then I’m guessing that you care, too. You care a lot about your job and the work that you do…There’s nothing wrong with any of that – either the passion you might have or the neutrality of those who don’t. But the point is this: when your co-workers don’t match your passion, don’t let that be a source of conflict.

Read more at The Tech Interview.