From the blog.

Managing Digital Racket
The more I tune out, the less I miss it. But that has presented me with some complex choices for a nuanced approach to curb
Complexity – My Friend, My Enemy
Over my years of network engineering, I've learned that the fewer features you can implement while still achieving a business goal, the better. Why? Fewer

MPLS Enabled Apps, Optimal Routing Design, Endangered CCIEs

308 Words. Plan about 2 minute(s) to read this.

I’m working through chapter 1 of MPLS Enabled Applications. Early impressions are that it includes context of *why* certain things are they way they are in the MPLS world. Understanding why is key to me, as I’m reading this book in preparation for CCDE. OTOH, the book is acronym heavy thus far, requiring me to carefully think through paragraphs when what a given acronym represents is not second nature to me. I’m not sure how far I’ll get with this one. I might end up picking and choosing, as my current rate of reading suggests I’ll need about 20 hours to get through it once.

I’ve completed the first 5 chapters of Optimal Routing Design, and plan to do more detailed write-ups of the content in the future. The book is one of the few “must reads” for CCDE. I find it a bit dated, but classic in its approach to routing design. By “dated,” I mean that while the logic is flawless, presenting case after case of how to layout networks to grow and scale, it doesn’t take into account the increase in computing power available to networking devices of today. This impacts design, OSPF in particular – not EIGRP as much. We discussed this on Packet Pushers Show 134 – OSPF Design Part 1 – Debunking the Multiple Area Myth. (No, we haven’t done a “part 2” yet. Yes, we’re talking about it.)

Much rage in the network engineering community over this bit of mucus sneezed into The Register’s hanky: Industry execs: Network admins an endangered species. The piece is essentially an HP marketing blog that claims network automation will render CCIEs needless. While I believe there’s a valid point to be made, the assertion is unbalanced as presented. I’m drafting a piece for my Network Computing blog expressing an alternative POV on the issue of SDN’s impact to the network engineer’s job.