From the blog.

Managing Digital Racket
The more I tune out, the less I miss it. But that has presented me with some complex choices for a nuanced approach to curb
Complexity – My Friend, My Enemy
Over my years of network engineering, I've learned that the fewer features you can implement while still achieving a business goal, the better. Why? Fewer

Is Demand For CCIEs in the US Job Market Climbing or Falling?

248 Words. Plan about 1 minute(s) to read this.

While perusing Brad Reese’s blog, I noticed a couple of recent articles asserting the following:

  1. The CCIE headcount in the US is actually declining.
  2. Of late, new CCIE numbers are being issued at the rate of ~9.3 a day.

Hmm…

  • In theory, if demand for the CCIE skill set is growing in the US, then CCIEs with the ability to work in the US should be a hot commodity. CCIEs who are American citizens are perhaps even hotter.  I can’t gauge if this is true or not.  I have one Cisco Gold Partner who has expressed a serious interest in me, but otherwise I haven’t been looking as I’m happily employed already.  If I got serious about job hunting, what would I find?
  • The high-tech job market outside of the US is booming. One of the comments on Brad’s blog indicated a demand for CCIEs in China and India.  That same commenter knows people who are moving back to India from the US.
  • CCIEs in the US aren’t maintaining their certifications.  Coupled with CCIEs who are heading out of the US back to their origin country, this has created a revolving door effect, where new CCIEs being added to the US program are negated by those who are leaving.

If you’ve got your digits and are in the US job market, what are you finding?  Are you in demand?  Are headhunters trying to land you with big compensation packages and other promises?  Or is it hard to get interviews?