From the blog.

Managing Digital Racket
The more I tune out, the less I miss it. But that has presented me with some complex choices for a nuanced approach to curb
Complexity – My Friend, My Enemy
Over my years of network engineering, I've learned that the fewer features you can implement while still achieving a business goal, the better. Why? Fewer

NMC DOiT Vol.2 Scenario 22 – Quick Overview

303 Words. Plan about 2 minute(s) to read this.

I completed NetMasterClass.com DOiT scenario 22 today.  This was an awesome lab.  I don’t know exactly why, but I got a lot out of this.  I felt “in the zone” all day.  The stuff I knew, I did well with.  I found some ways to save time by combining steps.  I piddled away some time with BGP and redistribution.  I got slowed down by BGP because I choose the neighbor addresses for a non-adjacent peer poorly, causing a few routing loops.  Redistribution was slow only because there were 22 (!) required redistributions, not including any “redistribute connected” that needed to be added.  I committed to a scheme early on, and only had issues with one little subnet that messed me up after I got everything going.

I’ll blog tech details tomorrow.  There were a number of interesting tasks and solutions.  I don’t think anyone could complete this lab in 8 hours, not unless you knew every single task off the top of your head and could implement the IOS code without errors.  Many of the tasks were tedious, like the redistribution I mentioned before.  The IPv6 was a little overbearing, I felt.  The multicast was almost comical – Anycast-RP with MSDP, plus literally every interface on every router included in PIM, and every multicast router supposed to be able ping and get a response back from every other router.  There was a traffic engineering task that required you to put in lots of little policy routes all over 4 different routers to man-handle a certain conversation.

It was all just a bit much, but still an awesome lab.  In all fairness to the creator of this monster, the RIP and EIGRP sections were super-simple, presumably to give you time to work on the other stuff.  But it was still insane.  Ah, well.  More on this scenario tomorrow.