From the blog.

Managing Digital Racket
The more I tune out, the less I miss it. But that has presented me with some complex choices for a nuanced approach to curb
Complexity – My Friend, My Enemy
Over my years of network engineering, I've learned that the fewer features you can implement while still achieving a business goal, the better. Why? Fewer

NMC DOiT Vol.2 Scenario 13 – Quick Overview

262 Words. Plan about 1 minute(s) to read this.

I got the scenario done today, and I was happy overall.  I still stink at multicast.  I don’t think I’ve ever got a multicast completely working, where all the ICMP responses are coming back as expected.  Maybe that’s an exaggeration.  But I know I’m fighting a mental block when it comes to how the tree gets built and the problems RPF can introduce.  I just have to get through some basic multicast exercises first, and be confident of how and why it’s working.  Then I can do better with the convoluted multicast scenarios on these practice scenarios.  It’s not the mechanics of multicast I don’t grasp.  I know what IGMP does and so on.  It’s more that I’m usually into hour 6 or 7 before I look at the multicast, and I’m kind of fried.  So if not all the routers can deliver an ICMP response to the sending router, my brain sort of goes into lock-up mode and says, “I don’t want to think about this right now.”

Stuff I nailed on this scenario (would have gotten most if not all points):  frame-relay, VLANs and switching, OSPF, RIP, EIGRP, router QoS, catalyst QoS, and GLBP.  Stuff I didn’t do as well on (only partial points):  router security, router maintenance, IPv6, a Cat specialty known as “mac address notification traps”, and multicast.  Would I have gotten 80 points?  Not sure…it would have been close I think.

Well, I have a social event to go get ready for right now, but I plan to blog more technical details tomorrow.  I learned lots of good stuff.