From the blog.

Managing Digital Racket
The more I tune out, the less I miss it. But that has presented me with some complex choices for a nuanced approach to curb
Complexity – My Friend, My Enemy
Over my years of network engineering, I've learned that the fewer features you can implement while still achieving a business goal, the better. Why? Fewer

My CCIE R&S Lab Equipment – UPDATED 09/08/2007

542 Words. Plan about 3 minute(s) to read this.

The equipment I’ve sequestered for my CCIE R&S lab rack follows. Short version on the IOS: you need 12.4 mainline, advanced enterprise services on your big routers. You need 12.3 mainline, enterprise base on your 2600s. And on the switches, you need the advanced/enterprise IOS, 12.2(25)SEE or higher, not the IP base image. The frame-relay switch doesn’t need to be anything special.

(2) Catalyst 3750G – 48 10/100/1000 ethernet
IOS C3750-ADVIPSERVICESK9-M c3750-advipservicesk9-mz.122-37.SE1.bin

(2) Catalyst 3550 – 48 10/100 ethernet
IOS C3550-IPSERVICESK9-M c3550-ipservicesk9-mz.122-37.SE1.bin

(1) 2621 – 1 V.35 interface, 2 10/100 ethernet, 64MB DRAM, 16MB Flash
IOS C2600-J1S3-M ENTERPRISE BASE c2600-j1s3-mz.123-23.bin

(1) 2621 – 2 V.35 interfaces, 2 10/100 ethernet, 64MB DRAM, 16MB Flash
IOS C2600-J1S3-M ENTERPRISE BASE c2600-j1s3-mz.123-23.bin

(1) 3640 – 16 V.35 interfaces, 2 10/100 ethernet, 64MB DRAM, 16MB Flash
IOS C3640-I-M c3640-i-mz.123-23.bin

(1) 3745 – 16 V.35 interfaces, 2 10/100 ethernet, 256MB DRAM, 64MB Flash, 128MB CF
IOS C3745-ADVENTERPRISEK9-M c3745-adventerprisek9-mz.124-16.bin

(1) 3745 – 16 V.35 interfaces, 2 10/100 ethernet, 256MB DRAM, 32MB Flash, 128MB CF
IOS C3745-ADVENTERPRISEK9-M c3745-adventerprisek9-mz.124-16.bin

(1) 3745 – 16 V.35 interfaces, 2 10/100 ethernet, 256MB DRAM, 64MB Flash, 128MB CF
IOS C3745-ADVENTERPRISEK9-M c3745-adventerprisek9-mz.124-16.bin

(1) 3745 – 16 V.35 interfaces, 2 10/100 ethernet, 256MB DRAM, 32MB Flash, 128MB CF
IOS C3745-ADVENTERPRISEK9-M c3745-adventerprisek9-mz.124-16.bin

There may be questions that come up about this pile o’ routers ‘n’ switches…

Q: How did you pay for all this?
A: I didn’t. This rack was mostly built from equipment left over from a data center migration. My employer is graciously allowing me (and other Cisco geeks in my company) to use this gear for test preparations. Call me lucky. If my employer wasn’t supporting me in this way, I’d be renting a rack – no other way to make it happen.

Q: Why 3750Gs? Those things are expensive!
A: Those came courtesy of a Cisco recall. As it happens, the serial numbers on those 2 3750Gs were victims of a manufacturing defect. So, we were sent 2 new 3750Gs to replace the defective ones. Cisco didn’t ask for the defective ones back. So…as long as they keep on working, they were lab freebies. I get to use them as substitute 3560s, since the 3750s are essentially 3560s with stack cables.

Q: Why so many V.35 interfaces?
A: Not because I need them. I need a grand total of 12 V.35 interfaces spread among various routers in the stack according to the NetMasterClass.com rack specifications. But as it happens, we had a bunch of spare 8 port V.35 NAMs. So I stuffed them in there more or less because they were handy, and I didn’t have a lot of NAM blanks around. Maybe I’ll get sick of seeing unused interfaces scroll by in “show run” outputs and yank them.

Q: Why those versions of IOS?
A: I loaded the most feature-rich set of the latest version and train of IOS that I could find to fit on the devices, given the DRAM and flash. I’m hoping that they have all of the needed features. So far, so good.

Q: Can I see pictures of the lab rack?
A: Check it out.  Kind of ugly, but you get the idea.

CCIE Rack